Latest news from the UO

  • OR Senate Confirms Sandoval as LC&D Commissioner

    On December 2, the Oregon Senate confirmed Professor Gerardo Sandoval as a commissioner on the Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC). During his term, which began December 1, 2019, and ends November 30, 2023, Sandoval will represent the Willamette Valley region. “This is tremendous for [the State of] Oregon,” said Director Jim Rue in the committee’s press release. “Dr. Sandoval’s research, experience, and perspective will help ensure our work benefits all Oregonians.” The commission, assisting the Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD), adopts state land-use goals and implements rules, assures local plan compliance with the 19 statewide planning goals, coordinates state and local planning, and manages the  coastal zone program. The commission is also tasked with implementing rules on issues as wide-ranging as wildfire planning and urban growth boundaries to re-zoning for “missing middle” housing and the push to allow breweries on hops farms. Sandoval is an associate professor in the School of Planning, Public Policy and Management (PPPM) at the University of Oregon. His work and research focus on the intersection of planning, immigration, and community change.   

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  • Oregon offers tax credit on gifts to venture development fund

    First published in Around the O.Across the UO campus, researchers from myriad disciplines make discoveries that lead to inventions, patents and spinoff businesses. Recent examples include Ksana Health, a new company cofounded by UO psychology professor Nick Allen that’s creating digital platforms to turn smartphones into wireless wellness tools.

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  • Innovative cell therapy research boosted by state funds

    First published in Around the O. An innovative new research project from UO’s Robert Guldberg has captured the attention of Oregon’s economic development agency Business Oregon and the UO’s Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation. Guldberg’s $1.2 million project, which zeroes in on one of the central challenges of the fast-growing cell therapy industry, is the first to tap into the University Innovation Research Fund. The new state fund is designed to support research at Oregon universities that drives innovation and economic development.

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  • Legislators get firsthand look at the UO's aging research boat

    First published in Around the O. The University of Oregon’s Institute of Marine Biology hopes  the Oregon Legislature’s 2020 session will lead to smoother sailing for its many students.

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  • Research Development Services pairs faculty with funders

    First published in Around the O on October 18th. Nicole Giuliani studies self-regulation, or how we control our feelings, thoughts and behaviors, and how the process applies to human health, but in September she found herself investigating how research funding works at the federal level.

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  • TallWood Design Institute Opens Timber Research Facility

    First published on at https://archenvironment.uoregon.edu. On Oct. 10, the TallWood Design Institute—a partnership between the College of Design and the OSU Colleges of Forestry and Engineering—hosted the grand opening of the A.A. “Red” Emmerson Advanced Wood Products Laboratory on the OSU campus.

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  • UO microscope points to more efficient solar fuels devices

    First published in Around the O on October 10th. A fundamental discovery made with a specially equipped microscope in a University of Oregon laboratory is pointing toward a new design strategy for devices that can produce hydrogen from sunlight.  

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  • Conover to deliver annual talk on UO research accomplishments

    First published in Around the O on October 7th. Scholarship, scientific inquiry and innovation will receive top billing at the State of Research talk, scheduled for 2 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14, in the Erb Memorial Union Crater Lake rooms. David Conover, UO vice president for research and innovation, will deliver the annual address, which will take a closer look at the growth and impact of the university’s research enterprise in 2018-19. “It’s an opportunity to recognize faculty who have won significant research awards or made great discoveries and to look forward to the year ahead,” Conover said. “Our researchers and scholars had some outstanding achievements, and it’s because of them that our research profile continues to increase.” In his talk, Conover will highlight accomplishments, drill down on performance metrics and offer a road map for the future of research and innovation. Open to all members of the university community and the public, the talk will include opening remarks by UO President Michael H. Schill. The 2020 fiscal year has only just begun, but the UO is already off to a fast start, Conover said. Major investments are being made in research tools, infrastructure improvements, research administration software and other resources. And large research grants addressing the epidemic of opioid abuse, earthquake preparedness and the expansion and modernization of UO zebrafish facilities have been awarded. As the UO looks ahead to the opening of the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact in 2020, research and innovation will continue to play a central role, Conover said. “Research creates jobs, improves human health, generates new knowledge and creates solutions to some of our most vexing challenges,” Conover said. “It’s a great time to celebrate our accomplishments and prepare for the exciting developments that lie ahead.”

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  • SPICE will hold its annual Science Open House on Oct. 9

    First published in Around the O on October 3rd. Science lovers of all ages will descend on the UO science complex Oct. 9 to join in the ninth annual UO Science Open House. Kids, families and teachers can choose from more than 20 hands-on activities presented by science outreach groups from on and off campus. Activities include the amazing egg drop, skulls and bones, rock detectives, and the science pentathlon. Pentathletes who participate in five or more activities can collect a prize — while supplies last.

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