Latest news from the UO

  • 2019 State Legislative Agenda

    During the 2019 legislative session, the University, in partnership with students, faculty and staff, will pursue a legislative agenda that aims to ensure affordability, access, and success for students; deliver an excellent educational experience in an inclusive and diverse environment; and invest in faculty members to improve quality and promote academic research and innovation. Access, affordability, and completion for Oregon students Increase operating funding for Oregon public universities by at least $120 million for the 2019-21 biennium to keep tuition increases for resident, undergraduate students at UO at or below 5% for the next two years. Increase funding for state programs, which include UO’s Engineering & Technology Sustaining Funds, Labor Education Research Center, TallWood Design Institute, dispute resolution programs, Clinical Legal Education, and other signature research centers. Increase investment in the Oregon Opportunity Grant, the state’s only need-based aid program. Protect and expand funding for Sports Equity Scholarships through the Oregon Lottery, which helps UO meet Title IX requirements to equitably fund women’s athletics and provide graduate scholarships. Invest in facilities that produce high-demand degrees and discovery All seven public universities request the allocation of $65 million for capital improvement and renewal for maintenance of existing buildings and ensuring that students have safe and appropriate environments in which to learn and live. $54 million in state-backed bonds for the renovation of Huestis Hall, a 45-year old structure that is the teaching and research hub for biological sciences at the UO. It serves 3,000 students each year. It has urgent seismic vulnerabilities and accessibility and safety deficiencies. The project will eliminate nearly $19 million of deferred maintenance and protect many of the UO’s K-12 pipeline and summer STEM programs for girls and low-income students. Academic excellence and ingenuity Create a state matching fund for the Sustainable City Year Program (SCYP), which embeds UO students and faculty members within an Oregon city, county, special district, or tribe for an entire academic year. Students work on partner-identified projects to provide ideas for real solutions to community challenges. Many communities—especially those in more rural areas—want to particpate but cannot afford it.  A matching fund would allow more Oregonians to be served. Through a one-time investment purchase a new ship for the UO’s Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, which will add teaching and research capacity on Oregon’s Coast. The UO will match the state’s investment through philanthropic gifts. Investment in the UO’s prison education programming, Inside Out, which operates in conjunction with the Oregon Department of Corrections to bring credit-bearing courses to approximately 300 inmates each year. Programs like these help reduce recidivism rates in Oregon and broaden the student experience. Support Governor Brown’s ‘Resilience 2025’ proposal that will fund the full build out of ShakeAlert by 2023. ShakeAlert is the earthquake early warning and wildfire monitoring seismic sensor network operated through the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, of which UO is an active member with other West Coast universities. Partnerships for Economic Transformation Support investments in research and discovery, including grant funding and other innovative policies or funding initiatives that leverage Oregon’s industry strengths and workforce needs with the UO’s academic portfolio.

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  • Collaboration gets $1.2 million NSF grant to boost STEM learning

    First published in Around the O, on October 31st. College students from first-generation, low-income, and minority backgrounds are 16 times less likely than other students to do well in STEM courses — science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The National Science Foundation wants that to change. And it’s giving researchers at the UO School of Journalism and Communication and the College of Education a $1.2 million, three-year grant to pursue a creative, interdisciplinary solution to the problem. The project is called My STEM Story, led by UO assistant professor of journalism Ed Madison, associate professor of education Jenefer Husman, education doctoral student Ross Anderson and UO alumnus Matthew Kim, who works as a research scientist at the University of Washington. The project will pair Oregon high school students with undergraduates from underrepresented communities for a mentoring program on the UO campus — with a digital storytelling twist. My STEM Story began 2½ years ago, when Madison had an aha! moment. Each summer, the Oregon Young Scholars Program brings high school students from minority backgrounds to the UO, where they stay in dorms and take college classes for a week. At the same time, college students from diverse backgrounds are on campus for the Summer Program for Undergraduate Research in Life Sciences, or SPUR, which offers fellowships to promising undergraduates to study under UO research professors. “It occurred to me: What if we took SPUR students and paired them with OYSP students for a mentorship?” Madison said. The goal is to give high school students from underrepresented groups an authentic view into the struggles and successes of people who look like them working in STEM. The team hopes the project, which is funded through the Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers program, will help students envision a future in the field.    With help from Anderson, Madison put the idea to the test in a trial run of the My STEM Story program in 2016. They introduced Emma, an Oregon Young Scholar, to Janice, a SPUR science fellow. Emma shadowed Janice on campus for a day to learn what it’s really like to work in a lab on a research project — especially as a black woman. Now a high school senior, Emma plans to study a STEM field in college. Madison, who teaches multimedia journalism in the School of Journalism and Communication, wanted to extend the benefits of the experiment to a wider student population. So he asked Emma to record her experience on her smartphone. That footage became part of a digital story Madison edited. In the next phase of the project, the researchers plan to present My STEM Story videos like the one featuring Emma and Janice to high school classes with high minority populations. “Then we’re measuring to see to what degree those videos inspire students who are watching them to either seek more information about a science class or register for a class they might not otherwise,” Madison said. The UO research team is currently in the internal review approval process, where they define protocols for the program. The next phase of My STEM Story will kick off in summer 2019. The project wants to put a human spin on STEM education, which can sometimes appear unattainable or overwhelming to students. “You have these ideas on and you go, ‘This would be kind of cool. I wonder if this would work,’” Madison said. “And then you see how the students involved develop this rapport so naturally and how the young woman who’s the scientist was so perfect. You couldn’t script that.” Coming from a long career in documentary and TV filmmaking, Madison loves those moments. He said recorded interactions often end up seeming staged and unnatural. But he believes that, because they are genuine interactions, high school students watching the videos will feel more connected and interested. Husman hopes that natural interest will turn into intrinsic motivation to pursue STEM education. “We hope to help students imagine their future possible selves as scientists,” Husman said. “Through near-peer mentorship, we provide them a window into the path they would need to take.” —By Becky Hoag, School of Journalism and Communication

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  • UO professor talks mega-quakes with National Geographic

    First Published in Around the O on October 29th. University of Oregon earth sciences professor Diego Melgar has been featured in an article from National Geographic discussing a recent 8.2 magnitude earthquake in Southern Mexico that broke a 37-mile stretch of tectonic plate. Slabs of the earth’s crust known as tectonic plates collide with one another on the surface, forming mountains and other topographic features. This tectonic movement is one of many things responsible for earthquakes, mountains, valleys and other topographic features, the article says. “If you think of it as a huge slab of glass, this rupture made a big, gaping crack,” Melgar says in the article. “All indications are that it has broken through the entire width of the thing.” This 8.2-magnitude earthquake struck southern Mexico on Sept. 7, 2017, and scientist are still unsure about how, when and why such large fractures in the earth occur. “If you bend an eraser, you can see the top half being extended and stretched, whereas the bottom bit is squashed and compressed,” Melgar says. “The same applies to these slabs. This bending can activate faults within the slab and trigger what are known as intraslab earthquakes,” the article adds. Melgar goes on to address possible answers to the question of why high-magnitude intraslab earthquakes happen. Noting that the presence of sea water, age and formation of the plate could have made perfect conditions for such an event. “Whether they feature this type of dramatic severance or not, these powerful quakes are inherently mysterious,” the article says. To read the full article, see “Quake split a tectonic plate in two, and geologists are shaken.”

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  • Campus will be bustling with homecoming, Fall Family Weekend

    First published in Around the O on October 26th. Homecoming has a long history of alumni reconnecting with classmates on the campus they once shared, and at the University of Oregon it also coincides with Fall Family Weekend, when parents and families reunite with their students. “Homecoming is a chance for our campus to celebrate the community that forms our past, present and future,” said Amy Quiring, director of major student events. “This year’s theme ‘Shout Oregon!’ helps us remember and highlight our campus traditions and pride through events and activities like painting the Skinner Butte O and Friday’s parade and pep rally.” Homecoming week will run Oct. 29-Nov. 4, with the bulk of activities happening alongside Fall Family Weekend. The homecoming parade will begin at 5:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 2. Decorated floats and marchers will represent residence halls and UO student organizations. All of the UO community — including faculty members, staff, and visiting families and alumni — are invited to line the parade route. The procession will begin at Kincaid Street and East 13th Avenue, head east to University Street, and turn right at the Erb Memorial Union. From there, the parade will loop around the south end of the building to the pep rally on the EMU Green. The pep rally is slated for 6-7 p.m. and will feature a variety of student performers, including musicians and dancers. Light refreshments will be available, courtesy of University Catering and Falling Sky. Between acts the emcees will highlight the university’s expanding food security initiatives — known as Feed the Flock — which have evolved out of the nationwide conversation about food security and hunger during students’ college years. “Bringing together students, families, alumni and our community in this celebration allows us to elevate the visibility of this year’s innovative Feed the Flock food security programs,” Quiring said. “It is a great opportunity for our community to be a part of something bigger: Ducks supporting Ducks to contribute to student success.” Quiring added that the UO Student Alumni Association will provide bins at the pep rally for accepting nonperishable food items for the student food pantry. In addition to the Ducks flocking in for homecoming, about 3,800 parents and family members have registered for Fall Family Weekend. Taking place Nov. 2-4, the weekend provides opportunities for families to visit campus, participate in activities and reconnect with their students. “We especially encourage the parents and families of our first-year students to attend,” said Tiffany Fritz, acting director of parent and family programs. “The weekend occurs at the end of the sixth week of classes, which is an important point in their student’s transition to the UO. It’s a way for families to celebrate their student’s success and to get a glimpse of Duck life.” Other homecoming happenings include football, volleyball and women's soccer games throughout the week, haunted campus tours Oct. 30 and 31 and Run with the Duck on Sunday, Nov. 4. A full list of events can be found on the homecoming website. —By Colleen Schlonga, Student Services and Enrollment Management

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  • UO research may soon make Oregon safer in quakes and fires

    First published in Around the O on October 16th, 2018. Research by UO seismologist and earth sciences professor Douglas Toomey is shaping a new set of policy agendas designed to help Oregon prepare for a Cascadia earthquake and other natural disasters. Toomey’s work on the ShakeAlert earthquake early warning system and its companion multihazard monitoring efforts informed Oregon Gov. Kate Brown’s just-released document, “Resiliency 2025: Improving Our Readiness for the Cascadia Earthquake and Tsunami.” “Imagine technology that enables you and your family to be notified before earthquake shaking arrives or that helps to reduce the growing impacts of wildfires,” Toomey said. “That technology exists, and we’re getting closer to being able to roll it out to the public in Oregon.” University of Oregon Department of Earth Sciences researchers, together with colleagues at the University of Washington, have been building out the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network for more than 25 years. The network is now supporting ShakeAlert, a collaboration of the U.S. Geological Survey; UO; University of Washington; University of California, Berkeley; and Caltech. ShakeAlert will provide seconds to minutes of warning, allowing individuals to determine the best course of action for safety. Through automation, industry, utilities­ and transportation sectors will be able to power down or protect critical operations. Implementing a statewide multihazards early warning system by the year 2023 is one of six strategies outlined in Brown’s Resiliency 2025 plan for improving Oregon’s preparedness for the Cascadia earthquake and tsunami. The plan calls for a multihazard warning approach that includes the ability to monitor and respond to wildland fires, landslides and other natural hazards. “We want to build out a single, cost-effective, multihazards warning system,” Toomey said. Toomey, the project’s principal investigator, and his team at the Oregon Hazards Lab are already working with faculty members at University of Nevada, Reno and the University of California, San Diego to leverage the expansion of seismic monitoring to real-time wildfire monitoring cameras. The project, known as AlertWildfire, uses communications technology similar to that of ShakeAlert. It provides access to state-of-the-art, pan-tilt-zoom fire cameras and associated tools to help firefighters and first responders detect, contain and mitigate wildfires. It will benefit Oregonians by offering program cost-sharing and leveraging technology for new purposes to protect natural resources and enhance public safety. “The real barrier is that it takes time to generate funding,” Toomey said. “There is clear support from federal legislators and state legislators who think it’s an important thing to do. Translating that support into funding takes time, and that’s what we’ve been doing over the past few years.” The governor’s plan includes a one-time request to the Oregon Legislature of $12 million in the 2019-21 biennium to fully build out Oregon’s multihazard sensor network by 2023. Pilot projects using ShakeAlert and AlertWildfire have been implemented throughout Oregon. For example, the Oregon Department of Transportation is developing an automated warning light system on critical, heavy trafficked Oregon bridges not designed for seismic loads, signaling pedestrians and motor vehicles to take alternate routes. Should these bridges fail under strong shaking, the warning light system can prevent potential life-threatening safety hazards. And the Rogue Valley Council of Governments is facilitating awareness of ShakeAlert in southwestern Oregon by crowd-sourcing solutions to systems or community issues. For example, a group of local engineers is developing a community database of building structure types within the county, noting each building's potential response to strong shaking. With support from the Bureau of Land Management, University of Nevada, Reno and UO teams recently installed AlertWildfire cameras on Steens Mountain and in the Blue Mountains in southeastern Oregon and several mountaintops throughout northern Nevada. More AlertWildfire camera installations in Eastern Oregon are in the works. “Continued investment in ShakeAlert and AlertWildfire is absolutely critical in order to have enough sensor density in this state to have the technology available to the public,” Toomey said. “We are grateful for Gov. Brown’s support and hope to win the support of the legislature next year.” The ShakeAlert project receives support primarily from federals sources such as the USGS, which currently provides $12.2 million per year. However, state contributions in California and Washington mean that public alerts will come to Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle well before they come to Oregon.  Currently, Oregon’s ShakeAlert network is only 38 percent complete and public alerting is not possible until it is at least 75 percent complete. The resiliency plan and funding for the hazards network may be included in the governor’s recommended budget, which will be released in early December. Final decisions on funding will not be made until the conclusion of the 2019 session. If the funding is provided, it will mean that public alerting will be available sooner to Oregonians.

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  • President Schill reflects, looks ahead in UO Today interview

    First published in Around the O on October 18th, 2018. President Michael Schill reflected on his first three years at the University of Oregon during a recent interview on UO Today, discussing topics such as the institutional hiring plan, groundbreaking on the Black Cultural Center, UO Portland and scholarships.   Schill said that over the last year one of the university’s key achievements was work on the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact. The progress included groundbreaking, the start of construction on the first two buildings and the arrival of new executive director Robert Guldberg. The full interview is available on the UO Today channel. UO Today is a weekly half-hour interview program hosted by Paul Peppis, a UO English professor and director of the Oregon Humanities Center. Each episode features a conversation with UO faculty members and administrators, visiting scholars, authors or artists. It is produced by the Oregon Humanities Center in collaboration with UO Libraries’ Center for Media and Educational Technology. An archive of past interviews is available on the Oregon Humanities Center’s website or on their YouTube channel.

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  • With the turn of a shovel, a new chapter opens in UO history

    First published in Around the O on October 17th, 2018. It was a moment that, looking back, will be seen as pivotal in the university’s history: Students, faculty, alumni, donors and UO officials broke ground on the long-anticipated Black Cultural Center last Friday under a glorious fall sky. Among the alumni on hand were those who laid the first blocks of the center’s foundation 50 years ago, as well as founding members of the Black Student Task Force who were instrumental in getting the process underway more recently. All looked on with pride as ceremonial shovels of dirt were turned, and the center’s construction phase officially began. The groundbreaking was part of a historic week of events on campus that included the inaugural Black Alumni Reunion and Black Student Convocation, a Freedom of Expression Series panel on protest featuring Danny Glover, and this year’s kickoff event in the UO African-American Workshop and Lecture Series. Applause and cheers of support were interspersed throughout Friday’s event as speakers discussed the long and winding path that led to the groundbreaking, and what the center will cultivate once its doors open next fall. “While it’s important to understand what will be located within the place, in my opinion, it’s even more important to understand what will come out of the Black Cultural Center,” said Vice President for Student Life Kevin Marbury, who has played a key role in the center’s development. He noted the transformative power a similar center had on the campus where he spent his days as an undergraduate and foresees the UO center having the same effect here. “The students that went into that space as young men and women were launched into adulthood because they had a place to breathe, to be, to grow,” he said. Speakers pointed out that the Black Cultural Center’s roots can be traced back to 1968, when members of the Black Student Union protested and asked for programs dedicated to their distinct needs. The effort gained traction in 2015 when members of the Black Student Task Force rallied on the steps of Johnson Hall with a list of 12 demands that included a cultural center. The task force met with President Michael Schill, which led to the creation of committees that sought ways to enact the group’s ideas and set the university on the path to Friday’s ceremony. Once complete, the 2,700-square-foot, $2.5 million facility at the corner of 15th Avenue and Villard Street will serve as a home base for academic and social activities for black students and showcase artwork that celebrates black heritage. “This day and the days to come are also, and should always be, about those who have advocated and organized in order to make it possible. To be clear, black students on this campus willed us to this day,” said 2016 alumna Shaniece Curry, who spoke at Friday’s event and whose work as president of the Black Women of Achievement helped spark the 2015 effort that led to Friday’s groundbreaking. “We are foremost here as function of the strength, courage and selflessness of Shaniece Curry and Black Women of Achievement,” added Jaleel Reed, also a 2016 alumnus and an original member of the Black Student Task Force. “We are here because of the collective work of the task force. We are here because of the Black Student Union of 1968. And we are here on behalf of all those that provided support, encouragement, resources and guidance. This cultural center is a testament to that collective work and that support.” Schill noted the significance of Friday’s ceremony, while acknowledging the work that lies ahead. “Breaking ground on the Black Cultural Center marks an important milestone in the evolution of our university and community,” he said. “It is both the culmination of an incredible amount of work and collaboration, as well as the beginning of an exciting journey that will continue to improve our campus community and culture. It is by no means the end of our collective work to ensure equity and inclusion is achieved at the University of Oregon.” In attendance were several donors whose generosity made the center possible, including Nancy and Dave Petrone, who gave a lead gift of $1 million; as well as Mariann Hyland, representing the Oregon Community Foundation; Janine and Joe Gonyea; and Jamie Smith Carr. Junior business major Maria Mbodj, who also spoke at the groundbreaking and is a member of the center’s planning committee, said the building’s influence will be immediate. “When I started out here, I wanted to find my community, and find my people,” she said. “When the center is complete, people won’t have to look that hard anymore to find community, because we’ll have the Black Cultural Center, and it will be a safe haven for them.” After the event, Curry said the process may have gained visibility thanks to her and her fellow students on the task force, but she said credit also goes to those who preceded her. “The conversation started way before my time,” Curry said after the event. “But as the conversation built up and gained momentum during my time on campus, I didn’t see how it was going to happen exactly. But I knew we had some students that were dedicated to it, and I knew we had some administrators that were dedicated to it. “But we did have a vision, and here it is.” The week was historic on multiple levels. It started with a freedom of expression panel discussion, “The Role of Protest in Transforming Education,” featuring civil rights activists Kathleen Cleaver and Danny Glover, hosted by the Black Studies Program. Earlier last Friday, the UO African-American Workshop and Lecture Series got underway with a speech by political strategist and commentator Angela Rye. The inaugural Black Student Convocation took place shortly after the groundbreaking at Gerlinger Hall. The event welcomed new and returning black students, as well as new black faculty and staff, to campus. Another first was the Black Alumni Reunion, with events held throughout the weekend, including a networking event, campus tours, tailgating prior to Saturday’s football game and Soul Sunday Brunch. Ericka Warren, president of the Black Alumni Network, said the groundbreaking was one aspect of what was truly a memorable weekend. She reflected on the role she played as a link connecting those courageous students who first protested in 1968 to those who are on campus today planning what will take place inside the center when it opens. “When reflecting on the past, there is a sense of sadness it has taken so long,” Warren said. “Yet this weekend represents a huge victory in the fight against racism, injustice and inequity.” She also was buoyed by the opportunity to build community: “One of the best parts of the weekend was to see the smiling faces of black students as they came in contact with hundreds of people who looked like them and being able to provide a forum for them to gain personal and professional guidance from alumni who had successfully navigated being a black student at the UO.” —By Jim Murez, University Communications

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  • Senator Ron Wyden, and Representative DeFazio Register Students to Vote on Campus

    First published in the Daily Emerald on October 16th. U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden and Rep. Peter DeFazio  encouraged students to register to vote while on the University of Oregon campus Tuesday morning. The last day to register to vote in Oregon before the midterm election in November is Tuesday. “You always hear from politicians, ‘this is the most important election in your lifetime,’” DeFazio said to Charlie Butler’s Media and Social Action ARC seminar in Allen Hall. “Well, this one actually is.” Wyden and DeFazio, both UO alumni, spoke in front of two classes and encouraged students to register. In their comments, they focused on national issues that have gained public attention recently, as well as the impact of voting on college affordability. “Students are really facing enormous economic pressures, and the challenges are really hard,” said Wyden in an interview. “There’s something students can do that’s easy to make sure their voice is heard and they can make a difference.” Sen. Ron Wyden speaks to a political science class about the importance of registering to vote on Oct. 16 — the last day to register in Oregon in 2018. (Sarah Northrop/Emerald) The pair was on campus supporting the efforts of VoteORVote, the Oregon Student Association’s campaign to get college students in Oregon registered to vote. The non-partisan group also informs them of the impact electing “pro-education” officials can have on student life, according to ASUO’s Internal Vice President Imani Dorsey. “It’s really important that students vote just to make sure they’re keeping their elected officials accountable to them,” said Dorsey. “Here at the U of O, we can see [tuition] increases to like 10%, like we saw two years ago because the state didn’t fund us at a level that we wanted.” The Congressmen stood in front of the opening slide of Gerry Berk’s Contemporary U.S. Politics lecture as they spoke to his class. The first point on the overview slide was “low turnout,” referring to the historic pattern of low voter turnout in midterm elections. “We’re faced with the question of women’s privacy, Judge Kavanaugh going on the bench, we’ve heard what Donald Trump is talking about,” said Wyden. “Day after day, I watch the powerful come in and they get their goodies.” DeFazio shared his personal experience taking out student loans. ”I wouldn’t be here today if I hadn’t gotten a little help, I took out in those days what were a lot of loans,” said DeFazio, “but my loans totaled about half of what most of you are going to graduate with.” When the Congressmen asked students who was already registered to vote, the majority raised their hands. Students in each class asked questions ranging in topics from climate change, net neutrality and immigration, to the impact of Michael Cohen’s re-registration as a Democrat. The pair remained on campus briefly after speaking to classes and tabled with student organizers at the corner of 13th avenue and University street, before they headed to Oregon State University in Corvallis for the afternoon. “It is important,” DeFazio said in an interview, for students, in particular, to get out and vote. “I would say the most direct link that all students would agree on is the affordability of a college education.” Political science students raise their hands in response to being asked if this is the first time they’ve registered to vote. (Sarah Northrop/Emerald)

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  • Legislators tour UO Oregon Resource Schools Network site

    First published in theworldlink.com on October 12th, 2018. COOS COUNTY – State senators spent two days touring local school districts this week. The 79th Legislative Assembly Joint Committee on Student Success ended its statewide tour in Coos County, having already traveled 2,678 miles from Salem and taken testimony from over 273 Oregonians. The purpose of the tour was to gain insight on how to improve public education and provide better funding. On Wednesday, the JCSS began the Coos County tour at the Coquille School District. “This has been an excellent way for us to see what is happening in the schools,” said Lew Frederick, State Senator for District 22 in Portland. “This is the last full tour . . . and this has to be one of my favorite things as a senator. We start off talking with a group of students, asking how they feel about things, what they think is working and not working, and we have heard powerful insights.” Though The World spoke with Frederick before the committee heard from Coquille School District students, he recalled some of the testimonies from students across the state. “Without fail, they talk about the fact that they feel they are over-tested and that the tests don’t tell them anything,” he said. “They don’t get information from the test and spend too much time preparing and cancels out other things they would like to be learning.” Oregon students have told the JCSS their concerns on mental health issues and the fact that schools lack mental health professionals. While at the Coquille School District, the JCSS took a look at how the district has improved its early learning. They also sat through a presentation at the Coquille Junior and Senior High School where they learned about the district’s participation in a new program through the University of Oregon. Professor of Practice Nancy Golden explained that Coquille High School is one of four schools in the state working with the university to “do our part to help high school kids graduate,” she said. The other schools in the pilot program include Roosevelt High School, Pendleton High School, and North Eugene High School. Essentially, the University of Oregon works with a well-respected teacher from each of these schools and makes them into a courtesy clinical professor. From there, they work together on issues the schools are having and come up with innovative ways to solve them. “That’s the big vision,” Golden said. From Coquille, Jennifer Sweeney is the teacher on special assignment. She has brought the district’s chronic absenteeism to the table and is working on ways to fix it with these other professionals. “In Coquille High, about 30 percent of our students are chronically absent,” Sweeney said. “Though the district is growing, the high school is declining. It’s an interesting juxtaposition, so our goal is to see why they aren’t going to school and my job is to help teachers solve the problem.” Golden hopes to expand the program to later include 10 high schools. “We’re learning from each other,” she said. “We included Coquille in the pilot because we wanted to be geographically diverse. We wanted to find a place where there is high respect for the superintendent, and here Tim Sweeney is superintendent of the year. He is known as an innovative leader and someone who understands curriculum instruction and assessments at a deep level.” District 5 Senator Arnie Roblan said the tour went well in Coquille. “Coquille is a good example of what creative school districts are doing to meet the need of some of our earliest learners,” he said. “Coquille was also clear they have work to do with attendance, and they have building needs but have been creative in solutions and in finding teachers.” He and Frederick addressed the teacher shortage and that they hope to find more resources to keep teachers in Oregon. “Right now we’re identifying the needs, what they cost and then how to get the revenue,” Roblan said. After the tour, Roblan said there are three workgroups that will put together ideas on what needs to be seen all over the state, cost estimates, and what the options are to make changes happen. “Our goal is to have policies and revenue in place by the end of the next session, so the beginning of the next school year,” he said. “That’s a big order.” The JCSS also met with the business community at Marshfield High School’s Pirate Hall, where professionals from places like the Bandon Dunes and Bay Area Enterprises met. “From the business community, we want to find out what they think the schools are doing,” Roblan said of the business round table. “Many are school board members, so they have perspective on how it works.” Local business members that spoke to the committee said that they would like to see students graduate high school trained to work with money, in the trades, and also have their driver’s licenses. During the tour, Frederick and the committee also saw that not every school had equal opportunities. He recalled during some student discussions, Career and Technical Education Programs were brought up by one student and another said they didn’t know they could take college level courses in high school. “That happened on a regular basis,” he said. Frederick hopes that the tour will result in positive change for Oregon schools, including putting counselors and mental health professionals in every school. “I think we can do that if we set it up with the community care organizations,” he said. “We can have CCO’s take that role and take the burden off the regular schools and education funding. I also think we need to find some way to increase revenues and not try to do this cheap approach to education.” Reporter Jillian Ward can be reached at 541-269-1222, ext. 235, or by email at jillian.ward@theworldlink.com. Follow her on Twitter: @JE_Wardwriter.

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